Fulbright-Tocqueville Chair Biographies

Current chair biographies:

  • January to June 2021

STEPHEN PORDER

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary biology

Brown University

Hosted by the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris

Welcomed by Jérôme Gaillaret, Geochemist and Professot at the Institut du Globe de Paris, in charge of the French Critical Zone infrastructure program OZCAR.

Porder is a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Brown University. His work focuses on understanding what limits the growth of tropical rainforests, and his more recent efforts have branched into understanding the environmental challenges of industrial agriculture, and the social, economic and ecological barriers to large scale tropical reforestation. He is also a Fellow in the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, the Director of the Climate Solutions Initiative, and the Assistant Provost for Sustainability. In this latter role, he leads Brown's efforts to eliminate fossil fuel combustion from campus, transition to 100% renewably generated electricity, and integrating teaching and research on sustainability into the daily campus life. He also works with other universities and others outside the academy to accelerate the transition to zero carbon emissions with the goal of slowing global climate change.

Project: Ecosystem science and the exploration of Earth's "Critical Zone"

 

While in residence at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Porder will pursue four concurrent objectives. He will teach a graduate level course in “Terrestrial Biogeochemistry”, initiate a research project with IPGP scientists on the development of landscapes over geologic time, participate in the trans-disciplinary “Politique de la Terre” program at the Université de Paris, and leverage his work across the ecological, geological and social sciences to help integrate ecosystem science into the French network of Critical Zone Observatories.

 

Titre accordéon: 
2019-2020
Contenu accordéon: 
  • September 2019-January 2020

VALERIE ORLANDO

Professor of French & Francophone Literatures

University of Maryland

Hosted by the Université Lyon 2

Welcomed by Touriya Fili-Tullon, Maîtresse de conférences en littératures francophones et comparées (Mondes arabes)

Valérie K. Orlando is Professor of French & Francophone Literatures in the Department of French & Italian at the University of Maryland.  She is the author of six books: The Algerian New Novel: The Poetics of a Modern Nation, 1950-1979 (UVAP, 2017), New African Cinema (Rutgers UP, 2017), Screening Morocco: Contemporary Film in a Changing Society (Ohio UP, 2011), Francophone Voices of the ‘New Morocco’ in Film and Print: (Re)presenting a Society in Transition (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009), Of Suffocated Hearts and Tortured Souls: Seeking Subjecthood Through Madness in Francophone Women’s Writing of Africa and the Caribbean (Lexington Books, 2003) and Nomadic Voices of Exile: Feminine Identity in Francophone Literature of the Maghreb, (Ohio University Press, 1999). She has written numerous articles on Francophone women’s writing from the African diaspora, African Cinema, and French literature and culture.  She has co-edited with Sandra Messinger Cypess, Re-Imagining the Caribbean: Conversations among the Creole, French, Spanish and English Caribbean (Lexington Books, 2014) and most recently with Pamela Pears, Paris and The Marginalized Author: Treachery, Alienation, Queerness, and Exile (Lexington Books, 2018).

Project:  Midnight Novelists, Experimental Narratives, and the Influence of the French New Novel on Authors of the Maghreb: 1950-to the New Millennium

This book seeks to establish a link between authors using experimental, avant-garde styles, notably those of the French New Novel in France, and Maghrebi authors (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia) writing at the dawn of decolonization into the postcolonial moment.  The work spans 1950 to the present and will contribute to understanding the chronology of writing of French expression from the Maghreb. 

 

  • February-July 2020

SATISH BUKKAPATNAM

Rockwell International Professor, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and Director of Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station – Institute for Manufacturing Systems

Texas A&M University

Hosted by Mohamed El Mansori, Laboratoire MSMP, Arts et Métiers - ENSAM (Aix-en-Provence)

Satish T. S. Bukkapatnam serves as Rockwell International Professor with the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering department at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA. He is also the Director of Texas A&M Engineering Experimentation Station (TEES) Institute for Manufacturing Systems. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in industrial and manufacturing engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. His research in smart manufacturing addresses the harnessing of high-resolution nonlinear dynamic information, especially from wireless MEMS sensors, to improve the monitoring and prognostics, mainly of ultraprecision and nanomanufacturing processes and machines, and wearable sensors for cardiorespiratory processes. His research has led to over 160 peer-reviewed publications (101 published/ accepted in journals and 68 in conference proceedings); five pending patents; $6.5 million in grants as PI/Co-PI from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the private sector; and 17 best-paper/poster recognitions. He is a fellow of the Institute for Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE), and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), and his work has been recognized with Oklahoma State University regents distinguished research, Halliburton outstanding college of engineering faculty, and Fulbright-Tocqueville distinguished chair awards.

Project: Fast detection of surface anomalies combining graph theoretic learning with multi-scale modeling methods                            

This startup project is an effort to advance optical sensing technologies for the emerging smart manufacturing applications. In this context, smart sensors should not just have the capability of measure the desired physical variable(s) but also infer the state of the process and provide more actionable information based on the measured signals. Recent advancements in data science and artificial intelligence methodologies underway at Professor Bukkapatnam’s group would be leveraged with multi-scale multi-physical modeling efforts at ENSAM to develop scientific principles underpinning this next-generation smart sensor systems. This effort would include collaborations with STIL, a growing small business based in South France, specifically focusing on creating transformative innovations based on their current optical sensors.

 

Titre accordéon: 
2018-2019 Chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • January-June 2019

James FARQUHAR

Professor of  Geology

University of Maryland

Hosted by the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) 

Welcomed by Marc Chaussidon (director IPGP), Pierre Cartigny (director GIS), Manuel Moreira (director CAGE)

James Farquhar is a Professor in the Department of Geology and the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at the University of Maryland. Dr. Farquhar’s research focuses on sulfur isotope geochemistry in a variety of terrestrial and extraterrestrial systems. Work by Farquhar’s laboratory spans the modern to the ancient and extends from the atmosphere to the oceans and solid Earth. Farquhar and coworkers are best known for the discovery of mass independent sulfur isotope signatures in samples from the early Earth that trace the evolution of oxygen and chemistry in the early atmosphere. Similar signatures for Mars tell of different conditions and reflect different reactions. Farquhar and coworkers have also used sulfur isotopes to trace metabolic and biogeochemical transformations for inorganic and organic sulfur compounds using laboratory experiments and ab initio approaches. Work in the not-too-distant future will shift to studies of atmospheric gases with a focus on regional and continental methane in modern systems with the establishment of the University of Maryland high mass resolution mass spectrometry facility. 

Project:  New Developments in the Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry of Sulfur  

James Farquhar’s Fulbright project will contribute to the educational and research missions of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) through the development of two interactive seminar courses and new techniques for the study of sulfur isotope geochemistry and cosmochemistry. The seminar courses will focus on topics related to Farquhar’s research specialization. One of these courses will focus on what sulfur tells about early Earth geochemical evolution, and the other will examine the fundamentals of isotope effects in geochemistry. The discussion and reading will focus on developing an understanding of the substance, structure, and strength of scientific hypotheses that underpin the content of the corses. Farquhar’s contributions to the larger research mission of the IPGP will focus on developing the next phase of sulfur isotope techniques using a state-of-the-art high resolution mass spectrometer that is one of only a few in the world. This work will focus on new approaches to study sulfur chemistry at the time the solar system formed and to examine connections between solar system bodies like the Moon, Earth, Mars, and asteroids.

 

  • February-July 2018

Héctor VALDIVIA

Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Hosted by Université de Paris-Sud
Welcomed by Ana Maria GOMÉZ, Director of Laboratoire de Signalisation et Physiopathologie Cardiovasculaire

Dr. Valdivia is the Frank N. Wilson Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and Co-Director of the Center for Arrhythmia Research of the University of Michigan. He attended medical school at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), in Mexico City, and then graduate school at the same university. In 1990 he finished his PhD degree from his combined work at UNAM and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. His PhD thesis was on the purification and characterization of scorpion toxins that block potassium channels, which started his career-long interest on ion channels. After a brief postdoctoral training at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and then at the University of Maryland, Dr Valdivia joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin in 1994, where he developed a strong program in cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology. His research focus is on intracellular calcium homeostasis and calcium channels, and the mechanisms that generate calcium-dependent arrhythmias. He uses multi-disciplinary approaches at the molecular, cellular and intact animal level for an integral study of physiological and pathophysiological calcium signaling in the heart. His work has been cited more than 7,000 times.

Project: Calcium-dependent Arrhythmias and the Role of Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Physiology and Disease

This project will offer a comprehensive theoretical and practical approach to general and specialized concepts on cardiac function during physiological and (some) pathological states. Topics to be covered in the course include general and fundamental aspects of heart function such as the genesis of electrical impulses, conversion of electrical signals into mechanical contractions, and the generation of mechanical force. A major focus of this project will be on the mechanisms that generate calcium-dependent arrhythmias. Because of the broad scope of functions that calcium ions (Ca2+) play in normal and pathological states of the heart, the course will cover fundamental aspects of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. The multidisciplinary research of this project will use molecular, cellular, whole organ and intact animal approaches to define mechanisms of contractile dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis produced by mutations in proteins involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release.

Next events:

  • October 16: Inaugural Lecture. Université Paris-Sud, Châtenay-Malabry, France.
  • October 18-19: Seminar at l'Institut du thorax, Inserm UMR1087, Nantes, France.
  • October 25-26: Seminar at IHU Liryc – L’Institut de Rythmologie et de modélisation Cardiaque – Bordeaux, France.

 

Titre accordéon: 
2017-2018 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • January-June 2018

Eric FULLERTON

Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineernig

University of California, San Diego

Hosted by Université de Lorraine

Welcomed by Stéphane Mangin, Teacher-Researcher at the Département Physique de la Matière et des Matériaux (P2M)

Eric Fullerton is a Professor of University of California, San Diego in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and NanoEngineering and is an Endowed Chair and Director of the Center for Memory and Recording Research. He received his B.Sc. in Physics from Harvey Mudd College in 1984 and his Ph.D. in Physics from UC San Diego in 1991. Previous to joining UC San Diego he held research positions at Argonne National Laboratory, the IBM Almaden Research Center and Hitachi Global Storage Technologies. His current research focuses the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanostructures, both as a probe of materials in reduced dimensions and for the development of novel magnetic storage, memory and processing technologies. He has co-authored 310 journal articles, been issued 51 US patents and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the IEEE.

Project: New Paradigms in Data Storage, Memory and Processing

The research and educational goals of this project to explore new and emerging nano-electronic devices with a focus on ultra-low-power non-volatile memory approaches that will enable a new generation of computer architectures. Educational efforts will also more broadly focus on the role of nanotechnology in the modern digital world. Such efforts are needed as future economic development and security will depend on the ability to store, transmit, manipulate, and mine ever-increasing amounts of digital data. The project will further establish a lasting collaborative Franco-American research and educational partnership between UC San Diego (UCSD) in the US with Université de Lorraine and Université Paris Sud in France. The collaborative research program will have the goal of establishing a Unité Mixte Internationale (UMI) which is an international laboratory sponsored by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS).

 

  • February-July 2018

Héctor VALDIVIA

 

Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Hosted by Université de Paris-Sud
Welcomed by Ana Maria GOMÉZ, Director of Laboratoire de Signalisation et Physiopathologie Cardiovasculaire

Dr. Valdivia is the Frank N. Wilson Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and Co-Director of the Center for Arrhythmia Research of the University of Michigan. He attended medical school at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), in Mexico City, and then graduate school at the same university. In 1990 he finished his PhD degree from his combined work at UNAM and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. His PhD thesis was on the purification and characterization of scorpion toxins that block potassium channels, which started his career-long interest on ion channels. After a brief postdoctoral training at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and then at the University of Maryland, Dr Valdivia joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin in 1994, where he developed a strong program in cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology. His research focus is on intracellular calcium homeostasis and calcium channels, and the mechanisms that generate calcium-dependent arrhythmias. He uses multi-disciplinary approaches at the molecular, cellular and intact animal level for an integral study of physiological and pathophysiological calcium signaling in the heart. His work has been cited more than 7,000 times.

Project: Calcium-dependent Arrhythmias and the Role of Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Physiology and Disease

This project will offer a comprehensive theoretical and practical approach to general and specialized concepts on cardiac function during physiological and (some) pathological states. Topics to be covered in the course include general and fundamental aspects of heart function such as the genesis of electrical impulses, conversion of electrical signals into mechanical contractions, and the generation of mechanical force. A major focus of this project will be on the mechanisms that generate calcium-dependent arrhythmias. Because of the broad scope of functions that calcium ions (Ca2+) play in normal and pathological states of the heart, the course will cover fundamental aspects of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. The multidisciplinary research of this project will use molecular, cellular, whole organ and intact animal approaches to define mechanisms of contractile dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis produced by mutations in proteins involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release.

Titre accordéon: 
2016-2017 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • January-June 2017

Allen MALONY

Professor of Computer and Information Science at University of Oregon. Welcomed by William Jalby at Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines.

Allen D. Malony is a Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Oregon where he directs parallel computing research projects, notably the TAU project.  He has extensive experience in performance benchmarking and characterization of high-performance computing systems, and has developed performance evaluation tools for a range of parallel machines during the last 25 years.  In particular, his research group has developed the open source TAU Performance System for large-scale supercomputing systems in production use around the world.  Malony's research interests also include computational science, neuroinformatics, and data science. Malony has been awarded the NSF National Young Investigator award, has been a Fulbright Research Scholar to The Netherlands and Austria, and has received the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.  He is funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the National Institutes of Health,, and the Department of Defense.  Malony is the Director of the UO Neuroinformatics Center and the CEO of ParaTools, Inc., which he founded with Dr. Sameer Shende in 2004.

 

  • January-June 2017

Martin RICHARDSON

Professor of Optics, Professor of Physics, Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at University of Central Florida. Welcomed by Lionel Canioni at Université de Bordeaux.

Professor Richardson is the Founding Director of the Townes Laser Institute, Professor of Optics, Physics and ECE, a Trustee Chair, Pegasus Professor and the Northrop-Grumman Professor of X-ray Photonics at UCF. Educated at Imperial College and London University, he previously held positions at NRC-Canada and the University of Rochester.  He is a world expert in the field of lasers, having spent most of his career in high power lasers, laser-plasmas and applications of lasers. He has established strong collaborations and serves on boards in many countries and has held visiting appointments in Germany, France, Japan, UK, Australia, Qatar and the former Soviet Union. A proponent of international science education, he has created several international degree programs. On joining UCF he established the Laser Plasma Laboratory specializing in the development of high power lasers, ultrafast lasers and their applications to laser-plasmas, X-ray and EUV sources, laser materials processing, and industrial, medical and defense applications of lasers.  Richardson has directed several major national laser research programs including  U.S. Army MURI programs. He has written over a dozen book chapters,  ~ 460 scientific articles and holds ~25 patents. At the international level he has acted in many capacities with governments, universities, companies and corporations, has chaired many international conferences and acted as an editor of several scientific journals. He is a recipient of the Schardin Medal, awarded by the German Physical Society, the Harold E. Edgerton Award of SPIE and is a Fellow of AAAS, OSA, IEEE, APS, JSPS, SPIE and IoP. In December 2013 he was honored with the ‘Docteur Honoris Causa’ of the University of Bordeaux.

Titre accordéon: 
2015-2016 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • February-July 2016

Timothy DEMING

Professor of Bioengineering and Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at University of California, Los Angeles. Hosted by Henri Cramail (Director) and Sébastien Lecommandoux (Assistant Director) at Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères Organiques, Université de Bordeaux.

Timothy J. Deming received a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of California, Irvine in 1989, and graduated with a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, under Bruce Novak in 1993. After a NIH postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst with David Tirrell, he joined the faculty in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1995. Here he held a joint appointment in the Materials and Chemistry Departments where he was promoted to Associate Professor in 1999 and Full Professor in 2003. His appointment is now as Professor of Bioengineering and Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as the Chairman of the Bioengineering Department at UCLA from 2006 to 2011. He is a leader in the fields of polypeptide synthesis, self-assembly of block copolypeptides, and biological activity of polypeptides, for which he has received awards from the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, the Materials Research Society, and the IUPAC Macromolecular Division. He was recently named a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.

 

  • January-June 2016

William WEEKS

Professor of Psychiatry and of Community and Family Medicine at Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College. Hosted by Bruno Ventelou, Professor at Aix-Marseille School of Economics (ASME), Université d'Aix-Marseille and Researcher with Groupement de Recherche en Economie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille (GREQAM).

William B. Weeks, MD, PhD, MBA, is Professor of Psychiatry and of Community and Family Medicine at The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. There, he works at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice as a Senior Research Scientist, where he teaches in several masters programs and conducts research on health economics, healthcare value, physician incomes, the complementary and alternative medicine market, and geographic variation in health services utilization in France. He is also Chair, Clinical and Health Services Research Program, at the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. There, he works on how doctors of chiropractic and other complementary and alternative medicine providers supply healthcare services, and how their patients use such services. Dr. Weeks has published over 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts examining economic and business aspects of rural veterans’ health care services utilization and delivery, physicians’ return on educational investment, and health care delivery science, including patient safety, quality improvement, Accountable Care Organizations, complementary and alternative medicine, geographic variation, and healthcare value.

Titre accordéon: 
2014-2015 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Sandra BABCOCK 

Clinical Professor of International Human Rights Law at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Hosted by Ms. Marie-Joëlle Redor-Fichot at Université de Caen, Basse-Normandie.

Sandra Babcock is a Clinical Professor specializing in International Human Rights at Cornell Law School. She has dedicated her career to the advancement of human rights in the United States and around the world. From 2006-2011, Professor Babcock directed the Human Rights Advocacy Clinic at the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law. There, she supervised students on wide variety of human rights projects, including the representation of a Saudi prisoner detained in Guantánamo, factual investigation for the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission, advocacy on behalf of prisoners denied access to justice in Malawi, and the presentation of shadow reports before the Human Rights Committee, Human Rights Council, and the Committee Against Torture. Since 1991, Professor Babcock has represented dozens of prisoners facing execution in the United States, and is recognized as a leading authority on the intersection of international law and capital punishment. From 2000-2006, she was Director of the Mexican Capital Legal Assistance Program, a project funded by the Government of Mexico to assist its nationals in capital cases at trial and on appeal. In 2004, she was counsel to the Government of Mexico in the case of Avena and other Mexican Nationals (Mexico v. United States), a case brought by Mexico in the International Court of Justice on behalf of 52 Mexican nationals on death row. Professor Babcock continues defend Mexican nationals facing the death penalty in the United States, but is also engaged in efforts to obtain new sentencing hearings for approximately 190 prisoners who were sentenced to death in Malawi. Professor Babcock has taught international human rights, international gender rights, and human rights advocacy. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Aguila Azteca, which is the highest honor bestowed by the Government of Mexico upon citizens of foreign countries. Professor Babcock speaks French, Spanish, Italian, and conversational German. 

 

  • 2nd semester:

Benjamin TENOEVER

Professor of Virology at Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai (ISMMS). Hosted by Mr. Patrick Charnay at Ecole Normale Supérieure and Mr. Marco Vignuzzi at Institut Pasteur, Paris

Benjamin tenOever completed his postdoctoral training in biochemistry at Harvard University after receiving a Ph.D. in medicine from McGill University. He is presently a Fishberg Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. His research program focuses on the molecular biology of viruses. He studies how cells respond to virus infection and the countermeasures employed by viruses to curb this response. The knowledge gathered from these studies is then used as a platform to develop tools for both research and therapeutics. His efforts have resulted in awards from President Obama, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Vilcek Foundation. Benjamin is also a Pew Fellow and a Burroughs Wellcome Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease. He will use the Fulbright-Tocqueville Distinguished Chair Award to teach a complete history of virology, from initial discoveries to present day applications, at the Ecole Normale Supérieur while expanding his research program at the Pasteur Institute.

Titre accordéon: 
2013-2014 Chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 


1st semester:

Christanne MILLER

Professor of American Litterature at University at Buffalo, New-York. Hosted by Mr. Antoine Caze at Université Paris Diderot, Paris 7.

Cristanne Miller received her PhD in 1980 and proceeded to a position as assistant professor at Pomona College, where she remained for 26 years--there receiving two teaching awards and being promoted to a distinguished professorship; at Pomona she served as the chair of Women's Studies, American Studies, and the English Department. In 2006, Cristanne took a position as the Chair of the English Department at the University at Buffalo SUNY where she has remained since, as Edward H. Butler and SUNY Distinguished Professor. She has written monographs and edited major collections in the fields of nineteenthcentury American poetry and modernist poetry, in particular on Emily Dickinson, Marianne Moore, a comparative study of literary community and gender in Berlin and New York, and on U.S. Civil War poetry. Additionally, she has co-edited The Selected Letters of Marianne Moore, The Women and Language Debate, and Feminist Measures: Soundings in Poetry and Theory. She is currently preparing a new annotated (and genetic) edition of Dickinson's complete poems for Harvard University Press and writing a monograph titled "Poetry After Gettysburg." She also edits the Emily Dickinson Journal.

 

  • 2nd semester :

Joshua OTAIGBE


Professor of Polymer Engineering and Science at the University of Southern Mississippi, School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. Hosted by Mr. René Fulchiron, professor at IMP, Université Claude Bernard, Lyon 1.

Joshua Otaigbe earned his B.S. degree in industrial chemistry (1979) from the University of Benin, Nigeria and his PhD degree in ploymer science and engineering (1984) from the Univeristy of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, UK. In 1995, Joshua founded Flaney Associates LLC, a company that provides technical consulting to polymer, chemical, and advanced materials companies. He has met requirements for British Chartered Engineer status. In 2002, Joshua Otaigbe joined the University of Southern Mississippi as the Professor of Polymer Engineering and Science. This followed a successful career in the College of Engineering at Iowa State University, which he joined in 1994 and where he was later promoted to tenured Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Materials Science and Engineering. Before joining Iowa State University, Joshua worked as a Project Leader for Corning Incorporated and also held academic positions at the University of Alberta, Canada, and the University of Benin, in Nigeria. Professor Otaigbe has lectured widely throughout the world, and from 2003-2012 he was awarded invited visiting professorships in the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH-Zurich) in Zurich, the French Engineering Universities, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées (INSA) in Lyon, and in the Université Jean Monnet in Saint-Etienne. He has also received a number of awards including the prestigious US National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Best Paper-Polyofins Award. He holds seven patents and has published more than 110 scientific papers on these and related topics.

Titre accordéon: 
2012-2013 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Pamela RONALD

Professor of Plant Pathology at the University of California, Davis. Hosted by Claude Nicole at the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Université Montpellier 2. 

Pamela Ronald received a B.A. from Reed College, an M.A. from Stanford University, an M.S. from the University of Uppsala in Sweden and her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 1985. She was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University from 1990-1992. In 1992, Ronald joined UC Davis as a faculty member where she served as Faculty Assistant to the Provost from 2004-2007. From 2003-2007 Ronald chaired the U.C. Davis Distinguished Women in Science seminar series, an event designed to support women's professional advancement in the sciences. In 1996, Ronald founded the Genetic Resources Recognition Fund, a UC Davis program to share benefits of biotechnology with less developed countries.

Pamela Ronald is Professor of Plant Pathology at the Genome Center at UC Davis. She also serves as Director of Grass Genetics at the Joint Bioenergy Institute, Emeryville and Adjunct Faculty at Kyung Hee University, Korea. She has engineered rice for resistance to disease and tolerance to flooding, which seriously threaten rice crops in Asia and Africa. Ronald led the isolation of the rice XA21 immune receptor, the bacterial Ax21 quorum sensing factor and the rice Sub1A submergence tolerance transcription factor. She and her colleagues were recipients of the USDA 2008 National Research Initiative Discovery Award for their work on submergence tolerant rice, and were finalists for the 2009 World Technology Award for Environment. In 1996, she established the Genetic Resources Recognition fund, a mechanism to recognize intellectual property contributions from less developed countries. She has written opinion pieces for the Boston GlobeThe Economist, and the New York Times, and is a blogger for National Geographic's ScienceBlogs. She and her husband, Raoul Adamchak, an organic farmer, co-authored Tomorrow’s Table: Organic Farming, Genetics, and the Future of Food. Bill Gates calls the book “a fantastic piece of work”. In 2009, Ronald received the National Association of Science Writers Science in Society Journalism Award and was nominated for the Biotech Humanitarian Award. In 2011, Ronald was selected as one of the 100 most creative people in business by Fast Company Magazine.

 

  • 2nd semester: 

Michel ROSENFELD

Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law - Director of the Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law - Yeshiva University. Hosted by Ms. Hélène RUIZ FABRI at Université de Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne, UMR de Droit comparé de Paris I.

Michel Rosenfeld received a B.A. from Columbia University, a J.D. from Northwestern University, and his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1991. He is a founding member and president of the United States Association of Constitutional Law, co- editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Constitutional Law (I•CON), and was president of the International Association of Constitutional Law (1999-2004). He was an editor of the University of California Press’ Series on Philosophy, Social Theory and the Rule of Law (1991-2002), and since 2003 an editor of the Series on Discourses of Law published by Routledge. Professor Rosenfeld has lectured widely throughout the world, and has been a recurring visiting professor at The University of Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne), The University of Paris X (Nanterre), The University of Aix-en Provence in France, The University of Carlos III in Madrid, Spain, The University of Bologna, in Italy, and the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. In 2007-2008, Professor Rosenfeld was awarded an International Blaise Pascal Research Chair at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. He was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Toronto in 2007. He held the Fresco Chair in Jurisprudence at the University of Genoa in 2007, was a Senior Fernand Braudel Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, in 2009, and the Chaim Perelman Chair in Legal Philosophy at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, in 2011. Among his many honors, in 2004 he received the French government's highest and most prestigious award, the Legion of Honor.

Michel Rosenfeld is the Justice Sydney L. Robins Professor of Human Rights and director of the Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Professor Rosenfeld  is the author of several books, including Affirmative Action and Justice: A Philosophical and Constitutional Inquiry (Yale Univ. Press 1991), which in 1992 was named outstanding book on the subject of human rights in the U.S. by the Gustave Meyers Center; Just Interpretations: Law Between Ethics and Politics (Univ. of California Press 1998), which was translated into French and Italian; Comparative Constitutionalism: Cases and Materials, ( 2d. Ed., West 2010) (with Baer, Dorsen, and Sajo),; The Identity of the Constitutional Subject: Selfhood, Citizenship, Culture, and Community (Routledge 2010) and Law, Justice, Democracy and the Clash of Cultures: A Pluralist Account (Cambridge U. Press 2011). He is the co-editor of The Longest Night: Perspectives and Polemics on Election 2000Hegel and Legal Theory; Habermas on Law and DemocracyCritical Exchanges; Deconstruction and the Possibility of Justice; and most recently with Andras Sajo of The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law (Oxford Univ. Press 2012); and editor of Constitutionalism, Identity, Difference and Legitimacy: Theoretical Perspectives. Several among Professor Rosenfeld’s works have been translated into: Chinese, French, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Turkish.

Titre accordéon: 
2011-2012 chair biography
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

David COHEN

Professor of Social Welfare at Florida International University, Miami, Florida - Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work. Hosted by Pascal-Henri Keller at Université de Poitiers, Faculté des Sciences Humaines et Arts.

David Cohen holds degrees from McGill University (B.A. in Psychology), Carleton University (M.A. in Social Work), and the University of California at Berkeley (Ph.D. in Social Work and Psychiatric epidemiology). He is a Professor at the School of Social Work at Florida International University, in Miami, Florida, a psychotherapist and a consultant. Dr. Cohen is recognized as an expert on the adverse effects of psychotropic drugs and on psychiatric drug withdrawal.

He is author or co-author on 120 publications journals and books in social work, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, medicine, law, ethics, and nursing. In 2003, he has received the Elliot Freidson Award for outstanding publication in medical sociology, and the Times Educational Supplement Award for Best Academic Book. Dr. Cohen is regularly invited to speak at conferences and frequently called upon as an expert.  

His research experience spans psychiatric epidemiological surveys to in-depth qualitative inquiries, with nearly 30 externally funded projects as principal or co-investigator. His recent grant from the Attorneys General Consumer and Prescriber Grant Program resulted in the creation and evaluation of CriticalThinkRx curriculum, a critical course on psychotropic medications aimed at non-medical practitioners and advocates in child welfare and mental health. CriticalThinkRx has been taken by over 4,000 social workers, psychologists and attorneys for continuing education credits. (www.criticalthinkrx.org). He is presently P.I. of an NIMH grant examining cultural factors in parental attitudes toward the prescription of psychotropic drugs to youths.

Titre accordéon: 
2010-2011 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Jack (John Francis) SANTINO

Professor of American Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University. Hosted by Mr. Pierre Lagayette at Université Paris 4 - Paris Sorbonne.

Dr. Jack Santino holds a professorship in Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University and is Director of the Bowling Green Center for Culture Studies. His work focuses on the practices of American holidays, celebrations, and festivals; as emergent rituals and memorialization; as well as occupational culture and popular music. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on August 1, 1947. He received a bachelor's degree in English at Boston College, and eventually got his Ph.D. degrees in Folklore and Folklife at the University of Pennsylvania. His thesis was entitled "The outlaw emotions: workers' narratives from three contemporary occupations". Dr. Santino has worked at the Smithsonian Institution's folklife program, organizing presentations at the annual Festival of American Folklife.  From 1996-2000, Dr. Santino was the editor of the Journal of American Folklore. In 2000, he was a guest professor at the Institute for North American Studies at the University of Alcala, Spain. From 2002-2003, Dr. Santino was the President of the American Folklore Society. Dr. Santino has worked on ethnographic films, notably the multiple Emmy Award-winning Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle: The Story of the Black Pullman Porter. He has published scholarly articles in major folklore journals, and is the author or editor of many books, including All Around the Year: Holidays and Celebrations in American Life; The Hallowed Eve: Dimensions of a Calendar Festival in Northern Ireland; Signs of War and Peace: Social Conflict and the Uses of Symbols in Public; New Old-Fashioned Ways: Holidays and Popular Culture; and most recently Spontaneous Shrines and the Public Memorialization of Death.

 

  • 2nd semester:

Leïla SADAT

Professor of International Criminal Law at Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri. Welcomed by Pr. Roxana Family at the Law School of Université de Cergy-Pontoise. 

Leïla Sadat is the Henry H. Oberschelp Professor of Law and the Director of the Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute at the Washington University School of Law, where she has taught since 1992. A leading authority in international law, international criminal law and human rights, Sadat is particularly well-known for her expertise on the International Criminal Court. Sadat received her J.D. from Tulane Law School, summa cum laude, and holds graduate law degrees from Columbia University School of Law (LLM, summa cum laude) and the University of Paris I - Sorbonne (diplôme d'études approfondies). Sadat practiced international business law for several years in Paris, France, prior to entering law teaching, and is admitted to the bar in Paris and in Louisiana. She clerked for Judge Albert Tate, Jr., on the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, as well as both of France's Supreme Courts, the Cour de Cassation and the Conseil d'Etat. A prolific scholar, Sadat is the author of several books and more than 60 articles on topics in international law, comparative law and human rights. 

Sadat is the Director of the Crimes Against Humanity Initiative, a multi-year project to draft and, ultimately, have taken up by States for negotiation and adoption, a proposed convention on the prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity. Her book on the subject, Forging a Convention for Crimes Against Humanity, will be published by Cambridge University this year. In 1995, Sadat was named to chair the International Law Association committee on the ICC, and served as an NGO delegate to the U.N. Preparatory Committee and to the 1998 U.N. diplomatic conference in Rome at which the Court was established, as well as at the Kampala Review Conference in 2010. Her monograph, The International Criminal Court and the Transformation of International Law: Justice for the New Millennium, which was supported by a grant from the United States Institute of Peace won the "Book of the Year" award from the International Association of Penal Law (American National Section), and is considered a “classic” text on the International Criminal Court.Sadat has also published several law review articles on U.S. foreign policy and international criminal law including Terrorism and the Rule of LawGhost Prisoners and Black Sites and Do all Arabs Really Look Alike?  Her most recent article, The Nuremberg Paradox compares the U.S. and French approaches to international criminal law and was published in the American Journal of Comparative Law and won the article of the year award from the International Association of Penal Law (American National Section). 

From May 2001 until September 2003, Professor Sadat served as a Congressional appointee to the nine-member U.S. Commission for International Religious Freedom. More recently, she was tapped to participate in a Council on Foreign Relations Special Report on international justice, as well as an ASIL study on US engagement with the ICC “beyond Kampala.” Professor Sadat is often heard on national media, and has an active speaking schedule. She is active in professional associations including the American Society of Comparative Law, the International Law Association and the American Society of International Law. She is also a member of the American Law Institute and the International Academy of Comparative Law, Vice-President of the International Association of Penal Law (American National Section) and has been the Chairwoman and a member of the Board of Directors of the International Law Students Association.

Titre accordéon: 
2009-2010 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Louis Edward WOLCHER

Professor of Philosophy of Law and Business Ethic (Chaire Charles I. Stone) at the University of Washington in Seattle. Welcomed by Pr. Roxana Family at the Law School of Université de Cergy Pontoise.

Professor Wolcher joined the faculty of the School of Law at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington in 1986, after nine years of law practice with the firm of Pettit & Martin, in San Francisco, and three years on the faculty of the Rutgers-Camden Law School, in New Jersey. His primary research interests lie in the fields of philosophy of law, legal and political theory, and human rights. Holding an undergraduate degree in history from Stanford University, he graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1973, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. In 1973-1974 he served as a law clerk to Bernard Levinson, a justice on the Hawaii Supreme Court. He has taught many different subjects, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, federal courts, antitrust, restitution, admiralty, human rights in philosophy and practice, critical perspectives on law, and philosophy of law. He also occasionally teaches a class on theories of justice to undergraduates in the University of Washington's Honors Program. A member of the editorial board of Law & Critique (Kluwer Academic Publishers), an international journal of legal theory, he also serves on the advisory board of the Slovenian Law Review (University of Ljubljana).

His honors include a recently awarded Fulbright-Tocqueville Distinguished Chair in American Studies for the fall semester of 2009 at University of Cergy-Pontoise School of Law, located near Paris, France, a Fulbright Award to study and teach in Slovenia, an invitation to lecture to the judges of the European Court of Human Rights, in Strasbourg, France, and a philosophical prize in the 2000 International Essay Competition, co-sponsored by the city of Weimar and the European cultural magazine Lettre International.

Recognized by the students as Teacher of the Year in 1992 and 1999, he was given the University of Washington's Distinguished Teaching Award in 2005. Professor Wolcher has visited and lectured at a number of institutions around the world, including the Institute of Political Science and Management (Uzbekistan), the University of California, Hastings College of the Law (San Francisco), Birkbeck College (London), the University of Ljubljana (Slovenia), Kobe University (Japan), Osaka University (Japan), Mofid University (Iran), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Irish Centre for Human Rights (Ireland).

The author of more than fifty articles, essays and book chapters, his most recent book, Law's Task: The Tragic Circle of Law, Justice and Human Suffering, was published in 2008 by Ashgate, and his book Beyond Transcendence in Law and Philosophy was published in 2005 by Routledge-Cavendish (Birkbeck Law Press).

 

  • 2nd semester:

Victor George RODWIN

Professor of Health Policy and Management, Wagner School of Public service, New York University. Welcomed by Professor Alfred Spira at the Ecole de Santé de Paris Sud and the Unité Inserm U. 822, santé reproductive, sexualité, infection à VIH, Epidémiologie, Démographie et Sciences sociales Université Paris –Sud 11, Faculté de médecine.

Victor G. Rodwin teaches courses on community health and medical care, comparative analysis of health care systems and international perspectives on health system performance and reform. Professor Rodwin was awarded the Fulbright-Tocqueville Distinguished Chair during the Spring semester of 2010 while he was based at the University of Paris–Orsay 11. In 2000, he was the recipient of a three-year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Investigator Award on "Megacities and Health: New York, London, Paris and Tokyo." His research on this theme led to the establishment of the World Cities Project (WCP) -- a collaborative venture among Wagner/NYU, and the International Longevity Center-USA, which focuses on neighborhood aging, po pulation health and the health care systems in New York, London, Paris, Tokyo and Hong Kong, and among neighborhoods within these world cities.

Professor Rodwin is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Health Planning Predicament: France, Quebec, England, and the United States (University of California Press, 1984); The End of an Illusion: The Future of Health Policy in Western Industrialized Nations (with J. de Kervasdoué and J. Kimberly, University of California Press, 1984); Public Hospitals in New York and Paris (with C. Brecher, D. Jolly, and R. Baxter), New York University Press, 1992); Japan's Universal and Affordable Health Care: Lessons for the U.S.? (Japan Society, 1994); Growing Older in Four World Cities: New York, London, Paris and Tokyo(edited with M. Gusmano), Vanderbilt University Press 2006; Universal Health Insurance in France: How Sustainable? Essays on the French Health Care System (Washington DC, Embassy of France, 2006); and Health Care in World Cities: New York, London and Paris (with M. Gusmano and D. Weisz), Johns Hopkins University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Recent journal articles have appeared in Health AffairsNew England Journal of MedicineAmerican Journal of Public HealthJournal of Urban Health, Health Economics Policy and Law, and Health Policy, Politics and Law.

Before launching WCP, Professor Rodwin directed the Wagner School’s International Initiative (1992 to 1998), and its Advanced Management Program for Clinicians (1987-1992). From 1983 to 1985 he was Assistant Professor of Health Policy at the University of California–San Francisco. Professor Rodwin has been a member of the Academy for Social Insurance since 1998. He reviews articles for leading journals in the field on a regular basis and has consulted with the French National Health Insurance Fund, the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program and the World Health Organization. Professor Rodwin earned his Ph.D. in city and regional planning, and his MPH in public health, at the University of California, Berkeley.

Titre accordéon: 
2008-2009 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Raphael J. SONENSHEIN 

Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at California State University, Fullerton. Welcomed by Ms. Frédérick Douzet at Université Paris 8 Vincennes- Saint Denis, Institut Français de Géopolitique.

Raphael J. Sonenshein received his B.A. in public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. He has written extensively on the relationships among racial and ethnic groups, and on the governance of American cities. His book Politics in Black and White: Race and Power in Los Angeles (Princeton University Press, 1993) received the 1994 Ralph J. Bunche Award from the American Political Science Association as the best political science book of the year on the subject of racial and ethnic pluralism. Dr. Sonenshein served as Executive Director of the City of Los Angeles (Appointed) Charter Reform Commission between 1997 and 1999. In 2006, Dr. Sonenshein was named Executive Director of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Review Commission to examine the system set up in the 1999 charter.

 

  • 2nd semester:

Lorenzo MORRIS

Professor of Political Science at Howard University, Washington. Welcomed by Pr. Frédérick Douzet at Université Paris 8 Vincennes- Saint Denis, Institut Français de Géopolitique.

Lorenzo Morris is a professor of political science, author and consultant on international and American public policy and electoral behavior. He is currently chairing the Political Science Department of Howard University. He has taught previously at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Senior Fellow in the Institute for the Study of Educational Policy. He has also served internationally as visiting lecturer in several francophone universities. He is a frequent television and radio public affairs commentator in Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland, West Africa, and the U.S.

He has published five scholarly books on race and presidential politics, higher education policy and on party politics. He has published approximately seventy articles on a variety of political concerns including black politics, Quebec politics, French party politics, race specificity in American public policy and U.S. foreign policy in Haiti. His most recent work includes “Presidential Impeachment” in The National Political Science Review and continuing research on African Americans in the Democratic Party. He has served as a consultant on several development assistance projects involving educational administration in Haiti, Botswana and Indonesia and electoral participation in Benin andSenegal. He was an advisor and/or election observer for several foreign elections including the U.S delegation in Haiti in 1990.

He has held leadership positions in several major scholarly and research organizations. He is co-director of the Census Information Center at Howard University. He has been president of the National Conference of Black Political Scientist. He was vice-chair of the University Senate and president of Phi Beta Kappa at Howard. He was born in Poughkeepsie, New York. He graduated from Fisk Universitywith honors and studied at Oberlin College and Yale University. He received his Ph.D.and M.A. degrees in Political Science from the University of Chicago.

Titre accordéon: 
2007-2008 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

Philip E. PROTTER

Cornell University, Applied Mathematics in Finance. Welcomed by Pr. Elyès Jouini at Université Paris Dauphine.

Protter joined the Cornell faculty in 2000 after twenty-two years in the Mathematics and Statistics Departments of Purdue University. Before that he had spent one year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and two years in the Mathematics Department of Duke University. While at Purdue he has held one year visiting appointments at the University of Wisconsin (Madison), and the Universities of Rennes, Rouen, and Paris 6 in France. He has also been an invited short term visitor at the Universities of Paris 1, 6, and 10; and the Universities of Strasbourg, Provence, Nice, Marne-la-Vallée, and Nancy in France; ETH in Zurich; the University of Rome 1; the University of Bonn and Humboldt University (Berlin) in Germany; and Warwick University in England. He has also given short courses (ranging from a week to a month) in Paris, Zurich, Perugia (Italy), Lahtia (Finland), and Santiago de Chile. He has also been a frequent visitor at INRIA, Sophia-Antipolis, France.Protter is currently Editor-in-Chief of Stochastic Processes and Their Applications, and Associate Editor of Finance and Stochastics, Mathematical Finance, Revista de Matemáticas Aplicadas, and Infinite Dimensional Analysis and Quantum Probability. He is formerly Associate Editor of the Annals of Probability, and the Annals of Applied Probability. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

 

  • 2nd semester:

William L. MEGGINSON

Oklahoma University, Corporate Finance. Welcomed by Pr. Edith Ginglinger at Université Paris-Dauphine.

Professor Megginson's research interests include international finance and corporate finance issues such as capital structure, venture capital and entrepreneurial finance, dividend policy and corporate control. Much of his recent research has focused on the privatization of state-owned enterprises, and he has recently served as a paid consultant for the Italian government, the New York Stock Exchange, the OECD, the International Federation of Stock Exchanges and Harvard and Princeton universities on the subject of listing privatized-firm shares on American stock markets. His teaching interests include corporate, international and entrepreneurial finance, and he won two teaching awards at the University of Georgia.Professor Megginson has published articles in several academic journals, including the Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking and Financial Management. His 1994 paper documenting performance improvements for newly privatized firms won a Smith Breeden Distinguished Paper Award for outstanding research published in the Journal of Finance. In addition, the paper has been reprinted by several publishing firms and organizations, including the World Bank. Professor Megginson is an associate editor for the Journal of Financial Research and has authored or co-authored four textbooks. Prior to entering academia, he worked for five years as a petroleum chemist in the oil refining and petrochemical industries.

Titre accordéon: 
2006-2007 chair biographies
Contenu accordéon: 
  • 1st semester:

George Alan BERMANN

Professor of Comparative International Law at Columbia University. Welcomed by Pr. Horatia Muir-Watt at Université Paris 1 - Panthéon Sorbonne. 

George A. Bermann is Jean Monnet Professor of EU Law and Walter Gellhorn Professor of Law at Columbia University, and he is the Director of the Center for International Commercial and Investment Arbitration, in this university. He is the founder of the Columbia Journal of European Law, past Editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Comparative Law and past President of the American Society of Comparative Law (ASCL). He is currently Editor-in-chief of the American Review of International Arbitration and Director of the American Arbitration Association (AA). Since 2003 he is also a Visiting Professor at the Collège de France, in Bruges (Belgium). He contributed to the establishment of the double degree in law between Columbia University and Université Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne.      

Charles P. HENRY

Professor of Political Science and African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Welcomed by Pr. Claudine Raynaud at Université François Rabelais, Tours.

Professor Emeritus of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and past Director of this department, Charles P. Henry is the author/editor of eight books and more than 80 articles and reviews on Black politics, public policy and human rights. Before joining the University of California at Berkeley in 1981, Henry taught at Denison University and Howard University. Appointed in 1994 to the National Council on the Humanities for a six-year term by President Clinton himself and past President of the National Council for Black Studies, Henry was also chair of the board of directors of Amnesty International U.S.A. from 1986 to 1988. 

  • 2nd semester:

Wade Clark ROOF

Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Welcomed by Professor François Weil at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS).

Wade C. Roof holds a PhD in the sociology and psychology of religion from the University of North Carolina. He is the J.F. Rowny Professor of Religion and Society at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He also serves as the chair of the University's Department of Religious Studies. His main areas of research interest are sociology of religion and American religious trends, and he has published widely in both fields, most recently serving as editor in chief for Macmillan Reference’s Contemporary American Religion (2000). He also teaches a range of both undergraduate and graduate courses on religion and society.

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